Normandy/Paris, June 2013, no. 1   2013 silver gelatin print photogram 16 inches x 12 inches unique Portfolio for  Dust: Plates of the Present,  Paris  Normandy/Paris, June 2013, no. 1  - 8 This series of photograms was started in Normandy, when I was visiting friends, and where I was to visit the grave of my uncle who died there in World War II. I had never met my uncle, as I had not been born yet. I had heard a few stories about him, scraps of other family members’ memories— that he was a dapper dresser, and an excellent waiter in the family restaurant, that he was my mother’s favorite brother, that he was a photographer and a journalist, and that my grandparents were heartbroken when they received the telegram. To my knowledge, besides one of his brothers, my uncle, no one else had been able to visit his grave. Looking out at the site — a very flat, long, wide sandy beach— it seemed miles before it met the water. I could only imagine the impossibility of its efficacy in wartime; there was no cover. Its constant movement could not erase its history—oscillating between the beautiful and the terrible. It was this constant opposition that I wanted to somehow capture in the photograms: the movement of the salt water washing over the sandy beach in darkness exposed by a searching flashlight. There was one problem: in my haste to make the train from Paris to Normandy I forgot the photo paper. I went looking for some. There were no stores, or time for shipping, but my friend’s friend said her brother was a photographer and she gave me two old boxes of photographic paper. That night, on the beach, when I went to take out the first sheet of paper, I found that the box was empty. The second box had only three scraps of paper— not unlike the scraps of what I knew about my uncle. The photograms made on the three scraps became just a hint of what was lost. Back in Paris, I decided to try to make the photograms from similar substances and particles, changeable and continually in motion-- constantly moving salt water and sand, in darkness exposed to a moment of light in an ocean concieved in the darkroom. The resulting series of photograms are unique, unable to be duplicated—the opposite of a photograph.
       
     
    Normandy/Paris, June 2013, no. 2    2013   silver gelatin print photogram   16 inches x 12 inches   unique   Portfolio for  Dust: Plates of the Present,  Paris
       
     
    Normandy/Paris, June 2013, no. 3    2013   silver gelatin print photogram   16 inches x 12 inches   unique   Portfolio for  Dust: Plates of the Present,  Paris
       
     
    Normandy/Paris, June 2013, no. 2    2013   silver gelatin print photogram   16 inches x 12 inches   unique   Portfolio for  Dust: Plates of the Present,  Paris
       
     
    Normandy/Paris, June 2013, no. 2    2013   silver gelatin print photogram   16 inches x 12 inches   unique   Portfolio for  Dust: Plates of the Present,  Paris
       
     
    Normandy/Paris, June 2013, no. 6    2013   silver gelatin print photogram   16 inches x 12 inches   unique   Portfolio for  Dust: Plates of the Present,  Paris
       
     
    Normandy/Paris, June 2013, no. 7    2013   silver gelatin print photogram   16 inches x 12 inches   unique   Portfolio for  Dust: Plates of the Present,  Paris
       
     
    Normandy/Paris, June 2013, no. 2    2013   silver gelatin print photogram   16 inches x 12 inches   unique   Portfolio for  Dust: Plates of the Present,  Paris
       
     
  Normandy/Paris, June 2013, no. 1   2013 silver gelatin print photogram 16 inches x 12 inches unique Portfolio for  Dust: Plates of the Present,  Paris  Normandy/Paris, June 2013, no. 1  - 8 This series of photograms was started in Normandy, when I was visiting friends, and where I was to visit the grave of my uncle who died there in World War II. I had never met my uncle, as I had not been born yet. I had heard a few stories about him, scraps of other family members’ memories— that he was a dapper dresser, and an excellent waiter in the family restaurant, that he was my mother’s favorite brother, that he was a photographer and a journalist, and that my grandparents were heartbroken when they received the telegram. To my knowledge, besides one of his brothers, my uncle, no one else had been able to visit his grave. Looking out at the site — a very flat, long, wide sandy beach— it seemed miles before it met the water. I could only imagine the impossibility of its efficacy in wartime; there was no cover. Its constant movement could not erase its history—oscillating between the beautiful and the terrible. It was this constant opposition that I wanted to somehow capture in the photograms: the movement of the salt water washing over the sandy beach in darkness exposed by a searching flashlight. There was one problem: in my haste to make the train from Paris to Normandy I forgot the photo paper. I went looking for some. There were no stores, or time for shipping, but my friend’s friend said her brother was a photographer and she gave me two old boxes of photographic paper. That night, on the beach, when I went to take out the first sheet of paper, I found that the box was empty. The second box had only three scraps of paper— not unlike the scraps of what I knew about my uncle. The photograms made on the three scraps became just a hint of what was lost. Back in Paris, I decided to try to make the photograms from similar substances and particles, changeable and continually in motion-- constantly moving salt water and sand, in darkness exposed to a moment of light in an ocean concieved in the darkroom. The resulting series of photograms are unique, unable to be duplicated—the opposite of a photograph.
       
     

Normandy/Paris, June 2013, no. 1
2013
silver gelatin print photogram
16 inches x 12 inches
unique
Portfolio for Dust: Plates of the Present, Paris
Normandy/Paris, June 2013, no. 1 - 8
This series of photograms was started in Normandy, when I was visiting friends, and where I was to visit the grave of my uncle who died there in World War II. I had never met my uncle, as I had not been born yet. I had heard a few stories about him, scraps of other family members’ memories— that he was a dapper dresser, and an excellent waiter in the family restaurant, that he was my mother’s favorite brother, that he was a photographer and a journalist, and that my grandparents were heartbroken when they received the telegram. To my knowledge, besides one of his brothers, my uncle, no one else had been able to visit his grave.
Looking out at the site — a very flat, long, wide sandy beach— it seemed miles before it met the water. I could only imagine the impossibility of its efficacy in wartime; there was no cover. Its constant movement could not erase its history—oscillating between the beautiful and the terrible. It was this constant opposition that I wanted to somehow capture in the photograms: the movement of the salt water washing over the sandy beach in darkness exposed by a searching flashlight.
There was one problem: in my haste to make the train from Paris to Normandy I forgot the photo paper. I went looking for some. There were no stores, or time for shipping, but my friend’s friend said her brother was a photographer and she gave me two old boxes of photographic paper. That night, on the beach, when I went to take out the first sheet of paper, I found that the box was empty. The second box had only three scraps of paper— not unlike the scraps of what I knew about my uncle. The photograms made on the three scraps became just a hint of what was lost.
Back in Paris, I decided to try to make the photograms from similar substances and particles, changeable and continually in motion-- constantly moving salt water and sand, in darkness exposed to a moment of light in an ocean concieved in the darkroom. The resulting series of photograms are unique, unable to be duplicated—the opposite of a photograph.

    Normandy/Paris, June 2013, no. 2    2013   silver gelatin print photogram   16 inches x 12 inches   unique   Portfolio for  Dust: Plates of the Present,  Paris
       
     

  Normandy/Paris, June 2013, no. 2
  2013
  silver gelatin print photogram
  16 inches x 12 inches
  unique
  Portfolio for Dust: Plates of the Present, Paris

    Normandy/Paris, June 2013, no. 3    2013   silver gelatin print photogram   16 inches x 12 inches   unique   Portfolio for  Dust: Plates of the Present,  Paris
       
     

  Normandy/Paris, June 2013, no. 3
  2013
  silver gelatin print photogram
  16 inches x 12 inches
  unique
  Portfolio for Dust: Plates of the Present, Paris

    Normandy/Paris, June 2013, no. 2    2013   silver gelatin print photogram   16 inches x 12 inches   unique   Portfolio for  Dust: Plates of the Present,  Paris
       
     

  Normandy/Paris, June 2013, no. 2
  2013
  silver gelatin print photogram
  16 inches x 12 inches
  unique
  Portfolio for Dust: Plates of the Present, Paris

    Normandy/Paris, June 2013, no. 2    2013   silver gelatin print photogram   16 inches x 12 inches   unique   Portfolio for  Dust: Plates of the Present,  Paris
       
     

  Normandy/Paris, June 2013, no. 2
  2013
  silver gelatin print photogram
  16 inches x 12 inches
  unique
  Portfolio for Dust: Plates of the Present, Paris

    Normandy/Paris, June 2013, no. 6    2013   silver gelatin print photogram   16 inches x 12 inches   unique   Portfolio for  Dust: Plates of the Present,  Paris
       
     

  Normandy/Paris, June 2013, no. 6
  2013
  silver gelatin print photogram
  16 inches x 12 inches
  unique
  Portfolio for Dust: Plates of the Present, Paris

    Normandy/Paris, June 2013, no. 7    2013   silver gelatin print photogram   16 inches x 12 inches   unique   Portfolio for  Dust: Plates of the Present,  Paris
       
     

  Normandy/Paris, June 2013, no. 7
  2013
  silver gelatin print photogram
  16 inches x 12 inches
  unique
  Portfolio for Dust: Plates of the Present, Paris

    Normandy/Paris, June 2013, no. 2    2013   silver gelatin print photogram   16 inches x 12 inches   unique   Portfolio for  Dust: Plates of the Present,  Paris
       
     

  Normandy/Paris, June 2013, no. 2
  2013
  silver gelatin print photogram
  16 inches x 12 inches
  unique
  Portfolio for Dust: Plates of the Present, Paris